U-M Classes for Honors Freshman

Libby is teaching this class for freshman at U-M:

Winter 2006
Honors Program
HONORS 135 – Ideas in Honors
Section 005: Women in Politics: From Susan B. Anthony to Sen. Hillary Clinton

Undergraduate Credits: 1
Advisory Prerequisites: First-year standing in the Honors Program.
Eligibility: Honors
Grading: Mandatory credit/no credit.
Primary Instructor: Benton,Elizabeth Patricia

How far have women in politics come since Lucretia Mott, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Susan B. Anthony and how far do they still have to go? This course will explore women in politics from the speeches and struggles of early women’s rights activists to the possibilities of America electing its first female president in the near future. We will look at the role of women as voters, activists, and politicians over the time period. This course will explore several questions relating to the issue: Why do women in politics matter? How do women act as a voting bloc? Are they a
voting bloc? Has the “glass ceiling? been broken? How is the role of women of color different or unique? The course will feature first hand knowledge of women in politics through special visits from current or former female elected officials. Course requirements will include weekly readings, in depth in class discussion and a final project.

My friend Emily Squires is also teaching a section which sounds interesting:

Winter 2006
Honors Program
HONORS 135 – Ideas in Honors
Section 003: Creativity and Consciousness
Undergraduate Credits: 1
Advisory Prerequisites: First-year standing in the Honors Program.
Eligibility: Honors
Grading: Mandatory credit/no credit.
Primary Instructor: Squires, Emily Jeanne

This class will explore ways in which communities and individuals use creative arts as resources and vehicles for social change. Examples from multiple art traditions and cultural contexts will be established, including, but not limited to, visual arts movements and meanings in South Africa during the anti-apartheid struggle; the practice of US printmakers during the Depression; and the influence of the Mexican muralist movement on future generations and goals of mural-makers. We will analyze the complex and shifting relationships between personal voice, community expression, and political movements in both historical and contemporary contexts. Class requirements include weekly course pack readings and a written response, as well as a final journal reflection. This class will be highly participatory with an emphasis on using the entire Michigan campus as our classroom.

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Author: Rob Goodspeed