Author: Rob Goodspeed

New Article Presents a Spatial Model for Prioritizing Green Infrastructure Locations

There is a lot of interest in green infrastructure in cities, which can refer to a variety of landscape elements like trees, swales, parks, and conservation areas, for fostering environmental quality, mitigating the urban heat island effect, and reducing stormwater runoff. However, there is a lack of methods for identifying which locations to prioritize for […]

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Are We in the Era of Platform Urbanism?

The Shifting Landscape of Cities and Technology For years it has been obvious that digital technologies have become deeply embedded in cities, but it has been difficult to conceptualize this change. My scholarly career has seen a revolving door of buzzwords and concepts surrounding technology in cities, like open data, open government, gov 2.0, civic […]

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Scenario Planning vs. Economic Theory

I used to think I had a handle on the basic theoretical debates between mainstream (or neoclassical) economics and urban planning institutions and practices, but a recent book opened my eyes to the realization that scenario planning’s focus on non-quantitative uncertainty is yet another area where planning conflicts with ideas from economics. Although my research […]

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New Paper Analyzes Eviction Cases Across Michigan

Last year I completed a research project on evictions in Michigan, conducted in collaboration with attorney Libby Benton and others at the Michigan Advocacy Project, a legal aid organization. This page summarizes the project, which resulted in a report and policy brief, released in May 2020. Today the academic paper produced by this project, “Eviction […]

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Book Reviewed in Planning

My book, Scenario Planning for Cities and Regions, has been included in the “Planners Library” feature in the August/September issue of the American Planning Association’s magazine, Planning. Reviewer Harold Henderson comments that “scenario planning looks to be made for the tumult of 2020 and whatever follows,” and notes “one of the book’s many strengths is […]

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